Ruby Range is a very powerful class. The three following methods provide often overlooked features when dealing with collections. >> (’a’..’z’).max #=> z   >> (’a’…’z’).max #=> y >> (’a’..’z’).min #=> a   >> (’a’…’z’).min #=> b >> (’a’..’z’).size => nil # WAT!   >> (’a’..’z’).count => 26 Use count versus size when dealing with non-integer collections. :)

Arrays commonly need to exclude the last value of an array, for example getting count of an array, and Ruby’s range class provides a quick syntax for this. >> (1..10).to_a => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]   >> (1…10).to_a => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]   # great for loops >> (1…10).count => 9 To remove the first integer try this. >> [(1..10).to_a[1]..(1..10).count] => [2..10] :)